This is the documentation for the latest (master) development branch of Zephyr. If you are looking for the documentation of previous releases, use the drop-down menu on the left and select the desired version.

Laird Connectivity Sentrius BT510 Sensor

Overview

The Sentrius™ BT510 Sensor is a battery powered, Bluetooth v5 Long Range integrated sensor that uses a Nordic Semiconductor nRF52840 ARM Cortex-M4F CPU.

The sensor has the following features:

  • ADC

  • CLOCK

  • FLASH

  • GPIO

  • I2C

  • MPU

  • NVIC

  • PWM

  • RADIO (Bluetooth Low Energy and 802.15.4)

  • RTC

  • Segger RTT (RTT Console)

  • UART

  • WDT

Sentrius BT510 Sensor, front view

Sentrius BT510 Sensor, front view

Sentrius BT510 Sensor, rear view

Sentrius BT510 Sensor, rear view

More information about the board can be found at the Sentrius BT510 website 1.

Hardware

Supported Features

The BT510 Sensor supports the following hardware features:

Interface

Controller

Driver/Component

ADC

on-chip

adc

CLOCK

on-chip

clock_control

FLASH

on-chip

flash

GPIO

on-chip

gpio

I2C(M)

on-chip

i2c

MPU

on-chip

arch/arm

NVIC

on-chip

arch/arm

PWM

on-chip

pwm

RADIO

on-chip

Bluetooth, ieee802154

RTC

on-chip

system clock

RTT

Segger

console

UART

on-chip

serial

WDT

on-chip

watchdog

Connections and IOs

LED

Two LEDs are visible through the BT510 housing lid.

  • LED_1A (green) = P0.22

  • LED_1B (red) = P0.20

Push button

The BT510 housing lid also acts as a push button.

  • BUTTON_1 = SW1 = P1.10

Magnetoresistive sensor

The BT510 incorporates a Honeywell SM351LT magnetoresistive sensor. Refer to the Honeywell SM351LT datasheet 7 for further details.

  • MAG = P1.14

Accelerometer

The BT510 incorporates an I2C ST Microelectronics LIS2DH accelerometer. Refer to the ST Microelectronics LIS2DH datasheet 6 for further details.

  • SDA = P0.26

  • SCL = P0.27

  • INT_1 = P1.05

  • INT_2 = P1.12

Temperature Sensor

The BT510 incorporates an I2C Silabs SI7055 temperature sensor. Refer to the Silabs 7055 datasheet 5 for further details.

  • SDA = P0.26

  • SCL = P0.27

Programming and Debugging

Applications for the bt510 board configuration can be built, flashed, and debugged in the usual way. See Building an Application and Run an Application for more details on building and running.

The BT510 features a TagConnect 10 way socket for connection of a programmer/debugger, refer to TagConnect TC2050 product page 2 for details of an appropriate TagConnect cable.

A non-standard layout is used to include access to the sensor debug UART.

Pin No.

Name

Description

1

Vcc

Power Supply, 3.3V

2

SWDIO

SWD Data

3

RXD

Debug UART RX Data

4

SWDCLK

SWD Clock

5

TM

Spare GPIO

6

SWO

SWD Output

7

N/C

Not Connected

8

TXD

Debug UART TX Data

9

GND

Ground

10

RESET

Reset, Active Low

Connectivity to the programmer/debugger must be modified to match the pinout shown above.

Laird Connectivity provide the USB-SWD programming board (750-03239) that supports this connector layout, refer to the USB SWD Programmer product page 3 .

Flashing

To connect the BT510 board for programming or debugging using the USB-SWD programming board, on the programming board set SW6 to the supply out position and SW5 to the 3V3 position, ensure there is a jumper on J35 and that SW1 is in the debug position, then connect the BT510 to the board using the Tag-Connect cable via J3:

Sentrius BT510 Sensor connected to programming board

Sentrius BT510 Sensor connected to programming board

Then build and flash applications as usual (see Building an Application and Run an Application for more details). For example, to flash:

$ ninja flash

Here is an example for the Hello World application.

First, run your favorite terminal program to listen for output.

NOTE: On the BT510, the UART lines are at TTL levels and must be passed through an appropriate line driver circuit for translation to RS232 levels. Refer to the MAX3232 datasheet 4 for a suitable driver IC. The USB-SWD programming board has an in-built UART connected to the BT510 acting as a USB CDC port, on Linux and Windows 10 this driver should be installed automatically, for Windows 7, the MBED driver is required to use the serial port - see the MBED Serial Driver 8 link for details and how to install the driver.

$ minicom -D <tty_device> -b 115200

Replace <tty_device> with the port where the bt510 can be found. For example, under Linux, /dev/ttyACM0.

Then build and flash the application in the usual way.

# From the root of the zephyr repository
west build -b bt510 samples/hello_world
west flash

Note that an external debugger is required to perform application flashing.

Debugging

The bt510 board does not have an on-board J-Link debug IC as some nRF5x development boards, however, instructions from the Nordic nRF5x Segger J-Link page also apply to this board, with the additional step of connecting an external debugger. The USB-SWD programmer board has a CMSIS debugger compatible interface and debugging can be performed using pyocd, openocd or any other applications that support the CMSIS interface.

Testing Bluetooth on the BT510

Many of the Bluetooth examples will work on the BT510. Try them out:

Testing the LEDs and buttons on the BT510

There are 2 samples that allow you to test that the buttons (switches) and LEDs on the board are working properly with Zephyr:

You can build and flash the examples to make sure Zephyr is running correctly on your board. The button, LED and sensor device definitions can be found in boards/arm/bt510/bt510.dts.