This is the documentation for the latest (master) development branch of Zephyr. If you are looking for the documentation of previous releases, use the drop-down menu on the left and select the desired version.

Ruuvi RuuviTag

Overview

RuuviTag is an advanced battery-operated open-source Bluetooth enabled sensor beacon platform capable of sending temperature, humidity, pressure, and motion information over Bluetooth Low Energy.

RUUVI RuuviTag

RUUVI RuuviTag (Credit: https://ruuvi.com/)

More information about the board can be found at the ruuvitag website 1.

Hardware

RuuviTag’s have the following physical features:

  • Nordic Semiconductor nRF52832 System-on-Chip

  • STMicroelectronics LIS2DH12 accelerometer

  • Bosch BME 280 temperature + relative air humidity + air pressure sensor

  • NFC™-A tag antenna

  • 1000mAh CR2477 battery

  • 2 buttons

  • 1 Green LED

  • 1 Red LED

  • IP67 Enclosure

  • Long range RF antenna

Supported Features

Interface

Controller

Driver/Component

ADC

on-chip

adc

CLOCK

on-chip

clock_control

FLASH

on-chip

flash

GPIO

on-chip

gpio

MPU

on-chip

arch/arm

NVIC

on-chip

arch/arm

RADIO

on-chip

Bluetooth

RTC

on-chip

system clock

SPI

on-chip

spi

UART

on-chip

serial

WDT

on-chip

watchdog

Humidity, Temp & Air Pressure

on-board

bme280

Acc

on-board

lis2dh12

Connections and IOs

LED

  • LED0 (red) = P0.17

  • LED1 (green) = P0.19

Push buttons

  • BUTTON0 = SW1 = P0.13

Pin descriptions

RUUVI Pinout
  • 2 = P0.29 = SPI_SCK

  • 3 = P0.28 = SPI_MISO

  • 10 = P0.04 = GPIO (can be used as a GPIO / ADC pin)

  • 11 = P0.05 = GPIO (can be used as a GPIO / ADC pin)

  • 12 = P0.25 = SPI_MOSI

  • 13 = P0.19 = LED2 (green) / GPIO (can be used as a GPIO pin but the LED will blink)

  • 14 = P0.17 = LED1 (red) / GPIO (can be used as a GPIO pin but the LED will blink)

  • 15 = P0.13 = Button / GPIO (can be used as a GPIO pin)

  • 16 = GND (Battery’s negative contact)

  • 17 = Battery’s positive contact

  • 18 = Battery’s positive contact

  • 19 = SWDIO

  • 20 = SWDCLK

  • 21 = P0.18 = SWO / GPIO (can be used as a GPIO pin)

  • 22 = P0.21 = Reset / GPIO (can be used as a GPIO pin if no need to reset the device)

  • 23 = GND (Battery’s negative contact)

  • 24 = P0.31 = GPIO (can be used as a GPIO / ADC pin)

  • 25 = P0.30 = GPIO (can be used as a GPIO / ADC pin)

GPIO = General Purpose Input Output pin

P1 = Standard 10-pin ARM Cortex debug connector (on RuuviTag Rev.B1-B5)

  • 1 = VDD

  • 2 = SWDIO

  • 3 = GND (Battery’s negative contact)

  • 4 = SWDCLK

  • 5 = GND (Battery’s negative contact)

  • 6 = SWO

  • 7 = No Connect

  • 8 = No Connect

  • 9 = GND (Battery’s negative contact)

  • 10 = Reset

P1 = TC2030 TagConnect (on RuuviTag Rev.B6)

  • 1 = Battery’s positive contact

  • 2 = SWDIO

  • 3 = Reset

  • 4 = SWDCLK

  • 5 = GND (Battery’s negative contact)

  • 6 = SWO

Programming and Debugging

Flashing

Build and flash applications as usual (see Building an Application and Run an Application for more details).

The easiest way to flash Zephyr onto a RuuviTag requires an external Ruuvi DEVKIT. More information about the board can be found at the ruuvitag devkit 2.

Once your tag is conencted to the DEVKIT and conencted to your PC, build and flash the application in the usual way.

# From the root of the zephyr repository
west build -b ruuvi_ruuvitag samples/basic/blinky
west flash

Advanced users may want to program the RuuviTag without the DEVKIT, this can be achieved via the SWDIO and SWDCLK pins located on the back of the RuuviTag.

Debugging

If using the Ruuvi DEVKIT refer to the Nordic nRF5x Segger J-Link page to learn about debugging Nordic boards with a Segger IC.

Testing the LEDs and buttons on the RuuviTag

There are 2 samples that allow you to test that the buttons (switches) and LEDs on the board are working properly with Zephyr:

You can build and flash the examples to make sure Zephyr is running correctly on your board. The button and LED definitions can be found in boards/arm/ruuvi_ruuvitag/ruuvi_ruuvitag.dts.