This is the documentation for the latest (main) development branch of Zephyr. If you are looking for the documentation of previous releases, use the drop-down menu on the left and select the desired version.

NXP X-S32Z27X-DC (DC2)

Overview

The X-S32Z27X-DC (DC2) board is based on the NXP S32Z270 Real-Time Processor, which includes two Real-Time Units (RTU) composed of four ARM Cortex-R52 cores each, with flexible split/lock configurations.

There is one Zephyr board per RTU:

  • s32z270dc2_rtu0_r52, for RTU0

  • s32z270dc2_rtu1_r52, for RTU1.

Hardware

Information about the hardware and design resources can be found at NXP S32Z2 Real-Time Processors website 1.

Supported Features

The boards support the following hardware features:

Interface

Controller

Driver/Component

GIC

on-chip

interrupt_controller

ARM Timer

on-chip

timer

SIUL2

on-chip

pinctrl

gpio

external interrupt controller

LINFlexD

on-chip

serial

SPI

on-chip

spi

Other hardware features are not currently supported by the port.

Connections and IOs

The SoC’s pads are grouped into ports and pins for consistency with GPIO driver and the HAL drivers used by this Zephyr port. The following table summarizes the mapping between pads and ports/pins. This must be taken into account when using GPIO driver or configuring the pinmuxing for the device drivers.

Pads

Port/Pins

PAD_000 - PAD_015

PA0 - PA15

PAD_016 - PAD_030

PB0 - PB14

PAD_031

PC15

PAD_032 - PAD_047

PD0 - PD15

PAD_048 - PAD_063

PE0 - PE15

PAD_064 - PAD_079

PF0 - PF15

PAD_080 - PAD_091

PG0 - PG11

PAD_092 - PAD_095

PH12 - PH15

PAD_096 - PAD_111

PI0 - PI15

PAD_112 - PAD_127

PJ0 - PJ15

PAD_128 - PAD_143

PK0 - PK15

PAD_144 - PAD_145

PL0 - PL1

PAD_146 - PAD_159

PM2 - PM15

PAD_160 - PAD_169

PN0 - PN9

PAD_170 - PAD_173

PO10 - PO13

This board does not include user LED’s or switches, which are needed for some of the samples such as Blinky or Button. Follow the steps described in the sample description to enable support for this board.

System Clock

The Cortex-R52 cores are configured to run at 800 MHz.

Serial Port

The SoC has 12 LINFlexD instances that can be used in UART mode. Instance 0 (defined as uart0 in devicetree) is configured for the console and the remaining are disabled and not configured.

Programming and Debugging

Applications for the s32z270dc2_rtu0_r52 and s32z270dc2_rtu1_r52 boards can be built in the usual way as documented in Building an Application.

Currently is only possible to load and execute a Zephyr application binary on this board from the internal SRAM, using Lauterbach TRACE32 2 development tools and debuggers.

Note

Currently, the start-up scripts executed with west flash and west debug commands perform the same steps to initialize the SoC and load the application to SRAM. The difference is that west flash hide the Lauterbach TRACE32 interface, executes the application and exits.

Install Lauterbach TRACE32 Software

Follow the steps described in Lauterbach TRACE32 Debug Host Tools to install and set-up Lauterbach TRACE32 software.

Set-up the Board

Connect the Lauterbach TRACE32 debugger to the board’s JTAG connector (J134) and to the host computer.

For visualizing the serial output, connect the board’s USB/UART port (J119) to the host computer and run your favorite terminal program to listen for output. For example, using the cross-platform pySerial miniterm 3 terminal:

python -m serial.tools.miniterm <port> 115200

Replace <port> with the port where the board can be found. For example, under Linux, /dev/ttyUSB0.

Flashing

For example, you can build and run the Hello World sample for the board s32z270dc2_rtu0_r52 with:

# From the root of the zephyr repository
west build -b s32z270dc2_rtu0_r52 samples/hello_world
west flash

You should see the following message in the terminal:

Hello World! s32z270dc2_rtu0_r52

Debugging

To enable debugging using Lauterbach TRACE32 software, run instead:

# From the root of the zephyr repository
west build -b s32z270dc2_rtu0_r52 samples/hello_world
west debug

Step through the application in your debugger, and you should see the following message in the terminal:

Hello World! s32z270dc2_rtu0_r52

RTU and Core Configuration

This Zephyr port can only run single core in any of the Cortex-R52 cores, either in lock-step or split-lock mode. By default, Zephyr runs on the first core of the RTU chosen and in lock-step mode (which is the reset configuration).

To build for split-lock mode, the CONFIG_DCLS must be disabled from your application Kconfig file.

Additionally, to run in a different core or with a different core configuration than the default, extra parameters must be provided to the runner as follows:

west <command> --startup-args elfFile=<elf_path> rtu=<rtu_id> \
   core=<core_id> lockstep=<yes/no>

Where:

  • <command> is flash or debug

  • <elf_path> is the path to the Zephyr application ELF in the output directory

  • <rtu_id> is the zero-based RTU index (0 for s32z270dc2_rtu0_r52 and 1 for s32z270dc2_rtu1_r52)

  • <core_id> is the zero-based core index relative to the RTU on which to run the Zephyr application (0, 1, 2 or 3)

  • <yes/no> can be yes to run in lock-step, or no to run in split-lock.

For example, to build the Hello World sample for the board s32z270dc2_rtu0_r52 with split-lock core configuration:

# From the root of the zephyr repository
west build -b s32z270dc2_rtu0_r52 samples/hello_world -- -DCONFIG_DCLS=n

To execute this sample in the second core of RTU0 in split-lock mode:

west flash --startup-args elfFile=build/zephyr/zephyr.elf \
   rtu=0 core=1 lockstep=no

References

1

https://www.nxp.com/products/processors-and-microcontrollers/s32-automotive-platform/s32z-and-s32e-real-time-processors/s32z2-safe-and-secure-high-performance-real-time-processors:S32Z2

2

https://www.lauterbach.com

3

https://pyserial.readthedocs.io/en/latest/tools.html#module-serial.tools.miniterm